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an environment that will be welcoming of the new economy, technology, and innovation to reinforce what we have been saying. we are the innovation capital of the world. with your help and involvement. we would like to have the rest of the city picked up and be part of it as well. we think we can have that conversation. we will need your help. we will need you to represent the new industry. these companies are here to keep the dialogue and collaboration at a high-level going with us. it is the ongoing dialogue like the one we are reading about a new tax structure for the city that does not punish the inventiveness we want to have. i would like to open with that introduction, welcome all of you here. i think he will see and hear an exciting introduction of these new companies. they're going to raise questions we do not have the answers to yet, but i do believe we have the spirit in this city to welcome solutions with your involvement. we will have the ability to do this on line as well is in these forums. i will be part of the ongoing discussion. i want to see all of you interact with the city an
city initiatives -- you know, this -- the schering economy working group will interface with or connect with, and how does it fit in with existing strategic goals and plans of the city? >> i think our director of environment in our city has issued a goal for 2020, being mission -- emission free, carbon neutral. that is something that when you think about the economic impact of these new business models, it can contribute quite greatly to that. i am going to answer the question a little bit differently -- i have been inspired by this space considerably. there's a lot more opportunity. cars, so many assets we have in our society. as a city, we own buildings, cubicles, museums, golf courses, so much that we have -- >> yes, but it is our property, right? >> yes. that is a very good point. stewards of these resources, and they are often underutilized resources, so how do we improve access to those? there is a lot to learn from this that could be applied to the public comments. >> thank you. let's open it up. do we have a microphone for people to come to? ok, we will just it old school. if yo
to do. we're proud to be here, part of the sharing economy, and hearing from you guys as well. >> i am the director of public policy at air b &b. it is an online community market place where residents can lift their haul -- list their homes for rent when they are out of town. i am travelling next week and plan on listing my apartment for rent to a visitor. these hosts are in 19,000 cities. the use the income to afford the increasing cost of living, whether paying off your mortgage, paying rent, or expanding income. travels who use the service are looking for a different experience from a hotel. we have hosts in every single neighbor had in the city -- neighborhood in the city that offers authentic experiences. the hosts take pride in being unofficial ambassadors of their neighborhoods. the visitors enjoy the experience. the state average of five nights. that is twice the average of the hotel guests. they patronize local businesses and experience of the city has to offer. -- experience all the city has to offer. >> i am one of the founders of get around. we are a marketplace for cars sh
in a global cloueconomy. it has altered local economies because so many manufacturing and technology jobs are moving, whether it is a matter of costs for going where the trained work force is. we're fortunate to have to governors here to talk about how that change affects their jobs and what they're doing to jump- start their economies which compete with one another. this could be fun. let me start with our guest. governor hickenlooper. i knew that was going to happen. most of us here are pretty much aware of california's budget crisis. can you give us a quick briefing on where colorado is and what you are trying to do to turn things around? >> our budget is just as dressed as almost every state in the country. we have been working trying to control costs, get our pension funds in line, our state employees have not had a raise in four years. it has been difficult all the way around. the real challenge has been to try and turn public sentiment and get people to recognize it without a strong economy. it will not solve any of these problems. we have been relentless in what we did, the bottom
it without a strong economy. it will not solve any of these problems. we have been relentless in what we did, the bottom up process and we asked them what they wanted to have as their economic future. and try to -- we had 13,that pal over the state and trying to find an economic vision for the state county by county. how do we become more pro- business? we heard people wanted to -- safety and more pro-business and less red tape and access to capital. it wanted a good education system. it is training so businesses can get the right workers. it is best known for its ski resorts and quality of life. the real challenge we have been working on in turning this thing around is to say, how do we become the most pro-business state? california will be more pro- business. oregon will be more pro- business. how to create that competition to be the most pro-business state but to hold ourselves to higher standards. we want to be the best of being pro-business. that focus, trying to get the partisanship to -- our legislators and state voters are one-third independent, republican and democrat and our legisl
of the biggest issues facing your district? >> in addition to the local economy that impacts the merchant corridors, to many vacant storefronts, transit issues, in every neighborhood we're having a real conversation about how we change, whether we should preserve aspects of the important characters of our neighborhood or think about building new things. there is also a real discussion we're having in many neighborhoods about affordability. i hear from too many tenants in the process of being evicted, homeowners being foreclosed on. we need to think about how all of us can continue to live in a city where the whole world wants to be. >> it is a great place to be. >> it is a great place to be. how do you balance the needs of your district versus the needs of the city as a whole? >> i have an incredibly diverse district. it encompasses north beach and chinatown. we have the city's famous hills. we have for the world comes to work, the financial district's, where the world comes to shop in union square, where the tourists spend time on fisherman's wharf , and the wonderful polk street neighbo
-tech economy with twitter and other types of work force issues moving forward and businesses moving forward to creation of construction that local residents have a good shot at jobs. the john avalos local hiring measure was important in making sure we get residents, but even in my district, there are pockets of poverty and many people out of work. supporting those unemployed and underemployed people, supporting struggling small businesses in a difficult economy, and i support the small businesses versus more chain stores that seem to be coming into the store fronts, but i try to be sympathetic to local businesses because they make up the diversity of our local neighborhoods. those are some of the challenges that face our businesses. >> are there other issues specific to your district? how do you balance the needs of the issues in your district against the needs of the city as a whole? >> i know that our district has a higher proportion of seniors than some other district, and there is a brand new senior complex and wraparound community services complex called the institution on aging bridge
, and the economy. without it, things simply can't exist. woman: we have good health in this country, in part, because we have clean water. and we shouldn't forget that, and we shouldn't take it for granted. melosi: in the late 19th century, serious waterborne disease epidemics were having devastating effects. roy: but then, in the early 1900s, we began to treat our water. and since then, we've seen a rapid decline in the incidence of waterborne disease. narrator: most cities treat drinking water through filtration, chlorination, and sometimes ozonation to kill pathogens in the source supply. these are complex treatment plants that cost millions of dollars to operate, but are necessary for our wellbeing. the treatment of drinking water has been called one of the greatest public health achievements of the last century. the water infrastructure itself protects the treated water until it comes out of our taps. it's been since 1911, since we had an outbreak of cholera or typhoid in the united states. but that doesn't mean that it can't happen. it can happen. if we aren't on our guard all the time
the importance of the other nine to five economy. the impact of all that you do has an impact on our job situation and local economy, and to highlight all of the great work that we can do together to ensure that the sectors that you all represent, the sectors that you work for, that you employ people for connaught is one of the greatest sectors in san francisco. i hope we will take the opportunity of the america's cup to showcase our clubs, our restaurants, our nightlife events. as someone who represents the broadaway neighborhood, an area of town that i used to spend a lot of time in when i was in my 20's -- but actually, very few locals take the time to head to the beach on broadway. our neighborhoods are coming together to say that broadway is open to the rest of the world as well as san francisco. i want to put san francisco back on the map when it comes to music. to make sure that we have the type of entertainment that we used to be renowned for. and those of you that work in our bars and clubs, i want to make sure that we are trading the kind of destinations that we look forward to
, the economy will stop. we did a major outreach. we trained an outreach team, who went to every community meeting, to educate people on how bad the crisis was. not only did i tell people that we'd have to raise rates, i told them we'd have to tear up the city to repair this infrastructure. man: you can't simply say, "i won't use any water, it's too expensive." we have about 25% of our population that's at or below the poverty line, so you have to look at rate structures that are tiered so the people can pay their bills. franklin: we would love to have something like 75% federal money. we do get some federal aid and we are thankful, but on the other hand, we're paying for this primarily with new rates. we have increased our rates to among the highest in america. but not nearly as much as if we hadn't passed a one-cent sales tax dedicated to water and sewer infrastructure. hunter: that sales tax counts for about a third of the revenue of the department right now. franklin: we got 75% of the voters to agree to tax themselves so that their children and their children's children could have cle
behind. we want everybody to enjoy the riches of technology. we want them to enjoy the economy in san francisco. that is why we're working so hard to make sure our central marketplace is welcoming of all these technology companies, making sure that we can work with other cities. i am very lucky to be part of the u.s. conference of mayors, and they allow me to represent san francisco as the innovative center for all the rest of the cities across the country. so we get to compare information and there. what these days i will get to talk to you while i am in washington, d.c., and you can hear what i am saying across there, so we can enjoy it -- wherever i go, you know i will be working and not fooling around. finally, we also are using technology to join our private companies in hiring san franciscans. hopefully some of your kids, some of your grandkids as well, are going to enjoy some of these great jobs in san francisco, because the companies that are here, many of them have agreed to use the virtual hiring practice called and share the technology to hire online send francis
or economy. the largest beneficiary would be california. we want to see what the cutting edge is. most of a still look for california. -- loomost of us still look to california. what governor brown said about the traditional politics is all about taking the thing in making it fresh. to a certain extent, i tried to be a writer in college. i failed miserably. a professor said everything has been set but not everything has been said superbly. even if it had, everything must be said freshly again and again. you have to see a fresh lead to a certain extent. the real issue with -- in terms of asking the president, what are the things that matter most, a bass part of those profits would be invested in california. colorado would have a significant -- pretty much every state in the country would benefit. you look at the companies based in silicon valley. they have offices, you want to expand your business, think about those young people in colorado. everything -- stated say the same thing. that money would get spent over the country very rapidly. >> thank you. governor brown. >> it is a good id
people together and focus on a larger goal, that winning means generations of kids win. our economy wins. what i think are things that we do well. all of so many other aspects of our society win out when we use these opportunities and invite a lot more to come together and think creatively as we are the innovation capital of the world. we will continue to do that and continue to invite more partners to be our partners in this great event. go sf super bowl! [applause] >> mayor lee, it is an honor to be chairing this committee. we won't be able to do this without you so thank you for your support today. we have a lot of folks around us. and one silverstein. [ laughter] >> all about rich. i just want to say thank you to the team at goodby silverstein, the social media campaign. you have worked incredibly hard. rich, your team is amazing. come up here and tell everybody about the logo and the campaign. [applause] >> we have to win this. we are not in it to come in second. we've got to win it. i challenge anyone to have better looking goal posts than that. we have remarkable area. we have a g
that this is a global economy. the opportunities are ones that we can only surpassed if we come together. we can win the future if we dream together, if we work together. as a society, as an economy, the best is yet to comment. let me leave you with this last idea. every moment affords us an opportunity to change the world. let's seize that moment in each and every moment that succeeds that moment and let's do that together in celebration of our asian-pacific heritage and recognition of the great heritage as all the people that make up san francisco and california. we will truly honored this month, our heritage and our future. thank you very much. [applause] >> ok. all right. we have some competition on the stage right now. >> a couple of other people we need to thank. we have a bunch of co-hosts, the san francisco board of supervisors. a round of applause, please. [applause] our event shares and co-chairs. [reading names] >> all right, thank you. [applause] >> those people give money, so please applaud. >> next, i would like to introduce betty yee, the 2014 candidate for controller. john, maybe you
and employment are put farther out of reach because of a felony conviction, especially in a down economy, someone with a felony has great difficulty even accessing 5 a job that pays minimum wage. putting these felony convictions to a whole population of young people, we really perpetuate a chronic underclass which benefits none of us. and then of course there's the inequity in the criminal justice system. even though we can show that drug use rates are quite similar in all different ethnic communities and african-americans are 13 times greater likelihood of being convicted of a felony of simple possession. then of course there's also the savings that we could experience, nonpartisan, independent legislative analyst office has determined that there would be $159 million annually of savings at the county level, plus another $65 million annually in savings at the state level. and our bill would direct a portion of that savings to drug treatment programs so that we can, like these 13 other states, have better outcomes, safer communities. i of course have to thank the sponsors of our bill, and we have
all of the resources. that what is takes to build the economy for the 31st century and that's what these grants are all b it's a pleasure to you here with you. >> >> [applause] >> thank you and thank you to our hud partners and at this moment i know i don't need to introduce him. i want to present to all of you mayor edwin lee. >> thank you henry and thank you deputy administrator henry for being here today. two fantastic planning grants from hud as part of a intense national competition and the reason we got this nod is the people decided they're going to come together and get this done. this is a choice. this is a choice that we made with our residents here that we're going to better ourselves. we're going to lift ourselves up. we're going to do it together. that's what it means. that's why the housing authority is here because they believe in the same thing. i want to thank the commissioners and staff and henry a fantastic job and all the leadership with all of the commissioners. i want to thank our partners. let 300,000 grants and they reflect the deputy administrator a
can be validated. let's get this but do it in a way that exacerbates the uncertain economy. the second -- we have to happen through innovation. whether it is the space program or tax credits for renewable energy. all that is important. we have to keep that going. that will get hard because we will face is demographics. that is my 74th birthday on april 7. i am aware of the and aging population which i have become and we are an aging population relative to what we were. luckily, we have millions of fresh arrivals that are younger and are energetic and they come from all over the world. we have to make sure our education system lifts them to their highest aspirations. when the society ages, it tends to -- it declines. that is the big demographic imperative. i was reviewing one of my favorite books on the roman republic. how did this village on the tiber grow to be the absolute leader of the known world in a few hundred years? it expanded its territory by plunder, by what ever. details. it was not pretty. [laughter] it added people, it kept getting bigger and incorporated the people and t
with us. help us bring more people into the economy, to the wonderful city of san francisco. * make sure that their lives are respected with dignity and with the prosperity this city has to offer. thank you for being here in this wonderful, wonderful city of san francisco. (applause) >> thank you, mayor lee. that was beautiful. it's now my pleasure to introduce mayor willie brown who is an iconic figure in our city. and as mayor lee said, the first african-american mayor of san francisco. it is such an -- and a very close friend of mayor moscone. so, it's my pleasure to introduce mayor brown. (applause) >> ann, thank you very much. mr. mayor, members of the boards of supervisors, assemblyman ammiano, [speaker not understood], moscone family, gay men's course, and all of you who are assembled herein, as i look around, i absolutely know that i had probably the greatest pleasure, other than the moscone children, of literally living with george moscone for so many years. mr. mayor, it was when we were in law school together, we were fellow janitors at hastings college of law. george moscone
leadership the economy grew and the city became an economic center for biotech and clean tech. gach newsom has been a trail blaitzer on combating homelessness and protecting the government. in 2007 he was re-elected as mayor with more than 70 percent of the vote, which is unheard of. please welcome our lieutenant governor, gavin newsom. >> my role was to get tom to speak. i'm just going to jump in because i want to keep you all on time. you've got an agenda packet and i'm going to be held accountable if you don't meet it. roslyn, let's pick up on tom's passion. he told me a couple points that are important, that is the consciousness awareness, this growing consciousness around bullying. and it's a question i guess that requires, has bullying gotten worse or have we gotten better to begin to recognize it? >> hard to know. tom and the president refer to as far too often as a rite of passage. we certainly are seeing evidence in ways that i don't recall, the levels of violence, the vitriolic violence, it's not just coming from the back of the school, it's coming at home, social media,
economy. our customer, i can completely agree with what shannon said in terms of our business objective, so to speak, is to empower entrepreneurs and innovators, to create jobs. that's a metric of success, not revenue generated per data set or some other per ifervance metric. the other piece of that looking back to the example of weather and gps, my monetization, is that together they contribute $100 billion to the american economy last year. last year alone from just those two data liberations. so, that is the way in which we are approaching from a strategy perspective, the ultimate impact to our customers. >> one super quick. one thing the city of san francisco or big cities or federal, right, the other smaller cities, smaller cities have smaller budgets. having a structure to support all this open data takes a lot of money. so, when these small cities are thinking about this, they should think about a way of somehow equalizing because they are putting into having these open data team, right? so, what does make sense? this is kind of an open question to get your point of view. >> do y
of these events is a loss for san francisco culture and our economy. it will take the right perspective of leadership from the mayor's office to make those events be able to happen. >> [unintelligible] [applause] >> i am very sorry that we lost some of these events. i'm sure they added to cultural diversity. i do know that looking at the board, there are 280 events in a given year. street fairs, hip-hop, promotional events. there is only so much that we can do. we have to make sure that every event has enough personnel to keep it safe. be it the security plan, officers, or police officers. that is one thing i failed to mention earlier. paramount to training for an event that has enough people to prevent anything disastrous from occurring, you never know what can be prevented, because you never know what you can stop from happening. you never know if people have enough resources to make sure they do not have a problem. >> down to the last few questions, we are running out of time. >> let's see how quick we can get to it. >> ok. >> we will be really fast. i commend the police department.
, but these three principles. mastery, been technically proficient in your area. it is economy, where you are able to take initiative, operate within a zone that has been broad enough for you to use your creativity. it is purpose. purpose on behalf of the people of san francisco. i think all of the nominees that we are honoring tonight are motivated by these principles. i want to thank the department heads who have employed them. they allow these people to flourish, to be an autonomous, and move forward in a way that benefits the people of san francisco. we think the best and brightest should be in city government. the people here tonight are proof that they are. finally, i want to mention a very meaningful thing for me to be here tonight on the night we are giving a lifetime of work to ed harrington. [applause] when i arrived in san francisco coming out of state employment some six years ago or so, ed was very generous in giving me advice. to say -- i will call. why are we doing this? who can i ask this question of? if i think it may have political implications or just to bounce it off him, he al
mayor this year. i wanted to make sure every neighborhood had a chance to share in the growing economy so we established the invest in neighborhoods program, and again who do i look forward to lead my programs in all of the communities? well tonight i want you to know that joaquin tores is heading up the program for the whole city, another great talent. [applause] and you know he has served as the director of neighborhood services for some time and he has gained a significant understanding of all of the neighborhoods. that's why i picked him. that's where the money is going by the way, and of course as he is leaving the neighborhood services who do i pick? who do i go for? well, christina paloan will be the next director of services. christina thank you very much for stepping up. [applause] as you all know too i have been struggling for this summer for the gun violence in our city, looking again for answers. it cannot just be our police department. we have to do more, and as you recall i wrestled with this whole concept of stop and frisk and many members of the latino members in
three days a week. one of the most important things they do is learning about the new economy and engage with the latest web and mobile technologies and they bring in entrepreneurers as guest speakers and share the work they're doing in our communities today and their career path and how technology influenced their lives so to spark america and the martinez brothers and others we thank you for your service. [applause] >> the next awardees will be recognized for their contributions in the field of business. to make this presentation we would like to invite to the stage the honorable from mexico mr. corona . [applause] >> jenny florez is the director -- i'm sorry. would you join us at the stage. [applause] jenny is a community development director of city northern california. she is responsible for the community development, investment in the community -- community redevelopment act program and making sure that under served communities in the marketplace have access to financial services and products. prior to her position with citi she served with the congress of california
's population and economy continue to grow we are decreasing our carbon emissions and achieve a sustainable environment. for instance this requires all new buildings designed to meet the gas reduction goals. that means more than 6 million square feet of commercial space and 11,000 housing units all in the development pipeline have been designed using these principles. [applause] in fact san francisco was recently recognized by the world green building council as having the greenest building policy by any local level in the year 2011 and we just began implementing our existing commercial energy performance ordinance which helps private property owners lower energy use. through san francisco's program green sf we are making it easier for property owners to secure financing for green building upgrades and as can you see green buildings has become the standard rather than the exception. for our public libraries to affordable housing units, even to the home of our world series giants and their structure our buildings are achieving lead certification at a rapid pace and our san francisco publ
, understand your business, talk to them as you are growing your business. when the economy is strong, all lenders are shopping for transactions. in times are tough on credit, you want to rely on those deeper liberation ships with your lender. you want to develop a relationship with a lender. it is the case where you want to open up an account, while to have another bank services that you want to have a relationship with your lender with it because when you go to them for any loan requests, you want them to know about your business and feel like they are a partner of yours, not just that you are shopping them. if you are shopping, you are just looking for the best deal from them, rather than a long- term relationship. >> i want to thank everyone for coming. hopefully, you have all signed up for our updates. we are going to be hosting these on a regular basis. the next two coming up will focus on becoming a government contractor, how your small business can partner with the government. the next one will also be on how to grain your business, with tax -- green your business, tax credits ava
shop and be a participant in our local economy. so, with that, joaquin, thank you for your leadership. we get to launch this wonderful program right here. there are three streets in district 4 that are going to benefit from this. we're going to roll this out to all other 85 neighborhood corridors in the rest of the city. it's that many? 25? [laughter] >> all right, christmas must be coming early. i'll talk to supervisor chu about any more monies we can release. thanks very much. >> thank you, mr. mayor. (applause) >> thank you. and now i'd like to bring up the supervisor, the district that we're in today, someone who is no stranger to the importance of supporting our small businesses whose family used to run a restaurant. and like to invite to speak now supervisor carmen chu. (applause) >> thank you, everyone, for being here today. i want to thank the mayor so much for coming out and launching this pilot here on irving street. as you know, when i came on board in 2007, one of the most important things we wanted to relay was how important it was to not only support our downtown busine
this is important, in the midst of crazy budgets and real chaos due to the bad economy and some of the massive cuts the schools have endured, this is so important because a student can't learn, we know, a student can't learn if they are fearful. they will skip school, they will not come or when they are there they are not able to concentrate and learn. so a school safety environment is no. 1 and we know that when you have that safe environment it's backed up by respect and trust, students will learn better, they will attend school better and academically they will do well and socially they will do well. so socially we're very concerned about implementing at the ground level these laws tom has led the way in enacting. >> but there are a lot of people who don't think this is an issue, unfortunately, sadly. i know you are a big believer in this in mental health and good physical health and the link to academics. could you talk about that, please? >> all the research points to having a healthy school environment, having health in your life, many students, a quarter of our students in california have
on the health of the region's economy. one of the key factors we have constantly come to our attention is that the qualitiv of our environment here in the bay area is key, is a very key factor to maintaining our economic health and vitality. we need strong economic -- sorry, environmental protections and regulations. we have come to the conclusion that c-e-q-a provides none of that. c-e-q-a is a law that is for all intents and purposes obsolete. some of the people who spoke before me mentioned that many, many federal and state statutes that have been passed since c-e-q-a was written into law in 1970, that duplicate what c-e-q-a does. all of c-e-q-a currently does is absent those additional protections is put in place a very lengthy process for review and a very low threshold for litigation. that low threshold for litigation invites bad players into the process. if you look at who sues projects and who tries to stop projects, three main constituencies, the environmental community is not one of them. the labor community sues projects for project labor agreements, to try and leverage thos
on an economy of scale, you know, go with organic with the ones that have the highest levels of pesticides. our website has a link to those tips so i can show you where that would be. and now we're going to pop into the living room and talk about flame retardants which are an important issue for any firefighters who are working in the field because it's those burns that are going to create exposures, so as folks in the home are thinking about that, once they found that frequent hand washing can reduce the actual levels of these flame retardants because we touch them, they get on our hands, they're in household dusts and make their way into our bodies, so washing them off our hands can reduce exposures, using a vak coupe with a hepa filter and a big move that could come down the pike is going down to legacy fabrics like wool and fabric that don't require the use of these mraim retardants at all and burn much more slowly, this's been some amazing videos that you can look at that you may have seen that show the legacy fabrics burning so much more slowly than the flame retardant treated ones, so th
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 65 (some duplicates have been removed)